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Joined 4M ago
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Cake day: Aug 10, 2021

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Thank you for the explanation. This is what I thought as well, even though the article felt hopeful, oh well… It would be great if one large European city would lead by example, I’m sure it would make passing these kind of laws much easier.


Does someone know how realistic this all is? Will they be able to actually get 170000 votes, or will they peak at a lower number?

Here’s hoping that this gets implemented, I’d love to see something similar in my city eventually


The ownership part sounds exciting to me as well, this is the first time I’ve heard about a coop. You also raise a valid point about it being open source. I just don’t really see it becoming as popular as bandcamp or Spotify, since for a regular consumer (who doesn’t like to hop platforms) I don’t think the features could be warranting a switch. I’ll definitely will keep an eye on this project though, I hope it takes off!


Interesting concept! Do you think there is a need to replace Bandcamp as well? To me it seems to be a better alternative to spotify, with a focus on the small creators as well


I’ll check it tomorrow! I didn’t think it would be highly useful, just sounded like a fun project!



Great, detailed post! I have been quite interested in the duo 100 rabbits and their focus on software that is energy-efficient, tiny, but still highly functional. Their virtual computer is easy to port and thus can be used on older, less powerful devices (even the nintendo ds or gba) as well. This approach, which favors electronics which we already have instead of rushing to the next thing is breath of fresh air to me. I also discovered Low tech magazine, which advocates also for longtermism, and using older, less powerful electronics. Anyone know other sites or people making programs or content focusing on longtermism? I’d greatly appreciate it!

I also started rethinking my approach to gaming. I always kept my bulky “gaming” laptop in order to play more graphically intense games, and even thought of upgrading, since some newer games (like Death Stranding) won’t run on my gpu anymore. But from now on, I’ll try to play those games which don’t want to force me to buy a new pc part or maybe a whole new machine, but rather make their games playable on lower end devices as well.


I was using Lubuntu (and before, Linux Lite) on an old laptop, and they ran okay. Now I run a very barebones Arch, and it is really snappy, also the battery seems to last a bit longer(but that may be psychological). So if you are into a bit of tinkering, I think give Arch (or Manjaro) a try!


For me, it’s not only that it’s federated, but that it’s limited and kind of small still. It helps me curb my “social media” usage, since there is no limitless stuff to see.


Thanks! The difference in architecture didn’t occur to me, but now I see



Does it have a name?

Also, plants! While not the most useful, but they bring so much joy! And also they are in the middle between an actual pet and a pet rock so that’s nice


Why are those better? Is it that they’re simply more powerful? I was thinking of the Pi for the low power consumption.


What else could one do to lower their expenses, do you think? Especially in a flat, it feels like I don’t really have alternatives.

Also, I would really like to get into self hosting, mostly for websites. I have an old Nexus 7 which I want ro experiment on, bit I might get a Raapberry Pi for a more permanent solution.



Sorry I don’t know much about this. Why would it be beneficial to install this in addition the package manager that’s already on my system?


Thanks, I did not know that! Saved me a year!


That’s also what I’m doing! It’s great to jump back in, and learning new things! Hope you have a great time doing it! Yes! I’m looking forward to understanding it better! It’s so different to have to learn to use the command programs I use, for example. I feel GUIs make the user able to use a program sufficiently very fast, but this way hide the way it functions. Reading man pages and looking at the output of the --help flag can be considered tedious, but I feel it allows me to understand the program better, and use it in a more flexible way. I guess what I’m trying to say is that the programs I’m used to usually very strictly tell you (through visual cues, etc), and these command line tools do not, or are at least much less strict. And I like that, it’s refreshing!


Seconding Pop, it’s a breeze to set up, and is very snappy! All my (very light, mind you) gaming is done on Pop_os


That’s a nice question! I am doing great, thanks! Just entering the world of Linux, and tinkering with everything is quite fun. How are you doing?